KONDO NO SHOKAI / NOTES JAN.FEB.2000- VOL.00-01 / $2.00 U.S.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

FROM THE DIRECTORíS CHAIR Mr.Terry Sanders , Hanshi

KNS MON INTERPETATION------------------2 AFFORDABLE TOURNAMENTS--------------2 OBSERVATIONS OF 1999----------------------3 AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A STYLE HEAD----3

REALM OF THE YUDANSHA

  • THE EDITOR
  • DOJO NEWS --------------------------------4
  • COMMENTS-----------------------------------4
  • BRAIN TEASE -------------------------------17
  • Quotations & Proverbs

=================================

MEMBERSíPROFILE

MARTIAL ARTS BACKGROUND ---5 Mr.Preicles Damiski

=================================

BOOK REVIEW- Special Feature

AMONG WARRIORS----------------6

BY ROBYN REBECA BATES

=================================

KYUíS KORNER

KARATE and ME-------------------------------15

Mr. David Lewis

VIVA KARATE, VIVAR ----------------------15

Mr. Samuel Vivar

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING TO DO-----16

Ms Beverly Guzman

TO DEMNING WE DID GO -----------------6

Mr. Scott Wiseman

O SENSEI----------------------------------------8

Mr. Chris Oshiyama

O SENSEI MEMORIAL-----------------------8

Mr. Chris Oshiyama

SHOREI-RYU IN BRAZIL-------------------9

Mr.Carlos R.. Silva

GREETINGS -----------------------------------10

Mr.David Richardson

NAIHANCHI 1, 2, 3 --------------------------10

Mr. C.Michial Jones

TRAINING IN SOLITUDE-------------------11

Mr. Terrance J. Dunn

LIVING WITH TRAUMA`---------------------12

Mr.Steve Saliz

PROMOTIONS---------------------------------12

Ms Tina Lawhorn

KARATE CAMP--------------------------------13

Mr.Juan CarlosTapia

HONBU VISIT---------------------------------14

Mr. Travis Bailey

MY TWO CENTS --------------------------14

Ms Rasheedah Polk

 

 KONDO NO SHOKAI / NOTES

KONDO NO SHOKAI MON

Terry Sanders-9Th Dan- Hanshi

Style Head Shorei-Ryu

Director Kondo No Shokai

Deming, New Mexico

Members of the Kondo No Shokai are entitled to wear our mon (J. seal, crest) and are encouraged to display it in their karate schools.

SHAPES - Traditionally, the circle represents endlessness. The martial tradition expressed through the karate of Okinawa should not end.

The octagon represents the contributions of Daruma (Dharma), Taishi an Indian Buddhist monk who brought the Eight-fold Path of Buddhism, tea culture, Zen (Ch'an), and a form of chuan-fa (a precursor of karate) to China's Shaolin (Pine Forest) Monastery. He stressed the need to overcome adversity.

The pine tree symbolizes all schools of karate that recognize the Chinese and Okinawan ancestory of their art.

The equilateral triangle represents the influence of the Trias family and the karate goal of equal amounts of power, speed, and form.

The symbolic hand positions (mudra) represent the ethics of karate practitioners:

1. At the left of the pine tree are two open hands (kaishu) meaning, "I come bearing no weapons?"

2. Above the pine tree is a right fist covered by a left hand (hoken) meaning, "Karate is my secret."

3. At the right of the pine tree are two hands in the praying position (kigan) meaning, "God guide my use of karate."

COLORS - Green symbolizes nature, youth, and the renewal of life. Red represents health, courage and right action. Blue denotes the vastness of the martial arts. Copper reminds us that all people of good character may study karate. Black is associated with fullness of life, knowledge, and finally, wisdom.

WORDS - According to Karate is My Life by R. A. Trias, Kondo No Shokai "... means New Pine Tree Society." As such, membership in the Kondo No Shokai is open to students of any karate style whose tradition includes reference to the pine tree (Ch. shao, J. sho) symbol.

________________________________________________________________________________

Affordable Tournaments

Shihan Dave Richardson of Silver City, NM has put into practice a great idea. Three or four times a year he puts on invitation-only tournaments in his dojo. What makes his tournaments praiseworthy are both his attitude and pricing structure.

What follows are notes taken from his current tournament flyer: 1. Several sentences describe how kumite will be judged. 2. "You must be a fun-loving, crazy, considerate nuts to attend the Tyrone Karate School Mini-Tournaments because we aim to have fun and enjoy ourselves." 3. Losing one's temper or talking back to the judges will result in the loss of one's place in the tournament. And my favorite, 4. "If one doesn't smile and enjoy oneself, we will have to dogpile you!"

At these tournaments there are no trophies awarded. Instead, those who earn the top three places receive certificates. The bad news is that Shihan Richardson has doubled (!) his entry fee. Now each participant in up to four divisions must pay a total price of two dollars!

Competition in these tournaments is intense, but the attitude among those involved is always cooperative and friendly. Tournaments in the nearest city usually cost $25.00 for one event. Attending

such tournaments, especially for the first time student can be expensive and frustrating.

 

 

Page 2

KONDO NO SHOKAI / NOTES

Affordable Tournaments

(Continued)

In southern NM 80% of the population earn incomes below the poverty line. As a karate school operator, asking my students to attend the relatively high priced tournaments in Las Cruces is unconscionable.

For me, the purpose of a tournament is to provide my students with an opportunity to compete against strangers. Having to deal with corruption, ego problems or inefficiency is not my idea of a good time. At Dave's tournaments, we take care of business, have a good time, and go home early.

________________________________________________________________________________

OBSERVATIONS OF 1999

In reviewing our first year of existence as a karate organization, several observations are worth sharing with the membership:

1. Respect - human relations are based on this concept. The easiest way to maintain a relationship is to remain true to the axiom, "Say what you mean and mean what you say."

2. There are a lot of karateka out there who are of good character. There are also a lot of flakes (see previous entry).

3. Our network of karateka is growing and is best described as being based on mutual respect and kindness.

4. The study of our kata takes a lifetime.

5. One of our objectives is the compilation of a history of Shorei-ryu Karate, with emphasis on the period from the end of WWII through the death of O-Sensei Trias in 1989. Recent efforts toward this goal have included interviews with current masters who knew O-Sensei over 40 years ago, a review of the martial arts publications during this period, and a comparison of bunkai in several other arts. For example, it is surprising to note the hidden movements in ippon kumite kata # 6.

Would someone do me the favor of locating the Popular Mechanics article about karate that made O-Sensei world famous and sending me a copy of it? If memory serves me correctly, this article was written in 1958. Our local library does not keep old magazine articles and PM's website archives don't go back that far.

6. A proper martial artist in Japan was supposed to divide training equally between bu (military tactics) and bun (study of the Chinese classics). In your pursuit of martial excellence you should endeavor to follow that example. For me in 1999, this included reading 11 martial arts related books and buying 4 videos relating to different martial arts. As an example, it is surprising how much one may learn of Shorei-ryu Karate by reading about the White Crane system.

7. Looks like Cathy Rodriguez-Contreras is doing a great job helping Shihan Charlie Contreras recover from the heart problems reported in our last issue. He is in good spirits and appears to be in great shape.

8. In the Fall Scott Wiseman (roku-dan) and Charlie Tapia (ni-dan) drove from Los Angeles to Deming for a few days of Shorei-ryu Karate and Shinkage-ryu Iaido training. Chris Hoshiyama (go-dan) of Phoenix joined them for one day. We spent a lot of time practicing karate and swapping stories and doing a little bit of historical research.

9. In December, Travis Bailey of Fort Worth trained here for a few days. He reviewed several Shorei-ryu kata and learned Shirotaro No Kon and Suparinpe. It is very good to have the membership train at honbu. You are all welcome.

________________________________________________________________________________

AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A STYLE HEAD

It has been my good fortune to have excellent martial arts teachers. My mother taught me to shoot, box, and fence during the first five years of my life. In 1961 Robert A. Trias began teaching me Shorei-ryu Karate and Kodokan Judo. Mr. Duk Sung Son taught me the Tae Han school of Tae Kwon Do during1965 - 1966. Intensive study of Shindo Muso Ryu Jodo and Jojitsu along with Shinkage Ryu Iaido in Japan occurred during the early 1980's. Mr. Jeff Cooper instructed me in the use of handguns in combat at his American Pistol Institute in Paulden, Arizona in 1986.

Page 3

KONDO NO SHOKAI / NOTES

AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A STYLE HEAD

(CONTINUED)

Shortly before his death in 1989, O-Sensei Robert A. Trias appointed me Style Head for Shorei-ryu Karate. His daughter and heir, Dr. Roberta Jane Trias-Kelley confirmed this appointment and assigned me to the position of Regional Director of the United States Karate Association, a position held until the Association's dissolution on January 1,1999. My dojo in New Mexico has been in operation since 1987, but karate practice and instruction have been a part of my life since 1961.
Two degrees and numerous post-graduate courses from the University of Arizona (B.A. 1969, M.Ed. 1972) have provided me with the credentials to counsel, administer and teach in public schools. To date, my career has included teaching social studies, special education, and English conversation, administering a junior high school and counseling at secondary and elementary schools in the American Southwest and Japan.
Terry B. Sanders - Style Head (Kaicho), Shorei-ryu Karate, D.O.B. August 16, 1947

________________________________________________________________________________

DOJO NEWS

Promotion Announcements

On behalf of all members of the Kondo No Shokai and especially the Yudansha of Shorei-Ryu Karate I would like to congratulate the following dans on their promotions. Ist, Shihan Dave Richardson who was promoted November the 25, to the rank of Shichidan. Shihan Richardson had this to say about his promotion, "My Brother presented me with the certificate on Thanksgiving day in front of my whole family. My instructor is crippled somewhat from a severe stroke and couldn't give it to me so he and my brother planned it this way. I thought it was great. So the time was about 2:30 pm on November the 25th 1999. Thanks again." Dave.

Also promoted since our last Newsletter was the " Tiger ", Mike Randall here in California. Mr.Randall was promoted to Nidan in Shorin Ė Ryu ( Kobayashi ) this past December 15 by the board of Yudansha under Oyakawa Sensei. He also holds the rank of NiDan in Shorei-Ryu, the KNS and with the CALIFORNIA FEDERATION OF BLACK BELTS under Master Philip Perales.

Mr. Randall has been an active tournament competitor over the years competing in all events. He is currently an instructor with the Long Beach Police Dept. (PAL) here in California.

Next in line to be acknowledged are Sandy Hernandez, and Ramon Rodriguez who were promoted on November the 1st to the rank of Shodan. The two karateka, students of Sanders Sensei, are from Deming New Mexico and study with him at his dojo there. Again we acknowledge their accomplishments and welcome them to the Yudansha family of Shorei-Ryu Karate.

________________________________________________________________________________

Some Notes from the Shorei-ryu dojo under Greg Allison Renshi

Long Beach, Calif. PAL-

Mike Randall - Asst. Instructor

It looks like we may have a new Black Belt, Renshi Allison and I will be promoting Surgio Limas to 1st Dan next week If all goes well. Also we recently tested for kyu ranks and had two students pass their belt reviews Bernie Pidlla to Purple belt and Green belt to Fernando Diaz. Congratulations to both them It was a grueling test. Well thatís about it for now, will bring you up to date in the next Issue.

________________________________________________________________________________

THANK YOU !!

To Hanshi Sanders, Sensei Salaiz, Sensei Baca, Sensei Ramon Rodriguez

Many thanks for the hospitality, teaching, early morning work, fixed radiator hoses, Gun ko-budo, Fresh Salsa (the best I've ever tasted), helping to defeat the mighty teddy bears, and the fellowship. We feel at home and comfortable whenever we come to the Honbu. It was fun exchanging knowledge and learning new knowledge. It was a good feeling.

Sensei Charlie Tapia, Sensei Scott Wiseman & sons Garland and Jonathan.

 

 

 

Page 4

KONDO NO SHOKAI / NOTES

Members Profile Ė A KNS Notes- Special Feature

MY MARTIAL ARTS BACKROUND

PERICLES DAMISKI VEIGA

7th Dan SHOREI-RYU

KNS Representative Brazil

Sao Paulo, Brazil

I started to practice martial arts in 1971. My first style was Budokan judo, with Master Sergio, a direct student of Hanshi Ryuzo Ogawa. I achieved an Ik- kyu Brown Belt in this style. My first contact with Karate was in 1973, when a friend of mine introduced me to his father Mr Chinen, who was a Master of Uechi-Ryu. He showed me a version of the kata Sanchin. After that I started in Sao Paulo to practice Shotokan, in which I received a shodan rank after 3 years of training. At about this time my teacher stopped teaching Karate, so I then started to practice Shito-Ryu with Master Seigi Suguimoto. I was with him for 3 years, before Master Suguimoto returned to Japan and closed his dojo in Brazil . Then , I went to ASSOCIACAO BRASILEIRA DE KARATE , the oldest studio in Brazil, founded in 1960 for Shihan Akamine and Tetsuo Kojima , Iwao Iokote and Moritoshi Nakaema, here I meet the most famous Karate-ka in Brazil at that time, Benedito Nelson dos Santos (Shotokan/Goju-Ryu). In the ASSOCIACAO BRASILEIRA DE KARATE, I learned traditional katas from Okinawa with Moritoshi Nakaema, applications and backgrounds of katas from Shuri, Naha and Tomari. Master Nakaema advise me to visit the Dojo of Master Morihiro Yamauty, which I did.

In December of 1985, I founded with Master Moritoshi Nakaema the ASSOCIACAO OKINAWA SHOREI-KAN DOJO.

It has been my honor to have joined Master Terry Sandersí Organization, KONDO NO SHOKAI, in the United States of America. I have been appointed THE KONDO NO SHOKAI representative for all Brazil since August 20,1999.

In my dojo we teach these katas: The Pinans series, Guekisai dae Iti, Ni, San and Shi, Saifa Dae and SHo, Naihanshi Sho, Ni and San, Seiyunchin, Shisochin, Sanceru, Seisan, Sepai, Santin, Tensho, Kururunfa, Suparimpei, Jitte, Jion, Juin, Matsukase, Wan Shu, Rohai,Nuseishi, Aoyamagui and Passai Dai. I promote many tournaments thoughout Brazil and am the head of the largest Karate Organizations in Brazil. The students of Shorei who wish to contact me, Grand Master Pericles should call

011- 011- 5611- 9601 or 011- 011-521- 0201.

My address is:

ASSOCIACAO SHOREI KAN DE KARATE DO

AVENIDA NOSSA SENHORA DO SABARA, 2773,VILA ARRIETE, SAO PAULO, SP CEP 04447-020 BRAZIL

Please write in Portuguese I don't speak any english or contact my Student Carlos Silva in Provo , Utah 801-343-2573, (580N.,100E.,#3,PROVO, UT, 84606-USA)

________________________________________________________________________________

BOOK REVIEW- A KNS NOTES- Special Feature

Robyn Rebecca Bates Book Review Dept.

Nikyu, Isshinryu, Kondo no Shokai

Among Warriors-A Woman Martial Artist in Tibet

by Pamela Logan

Paperback - 298 pages Reprint edition (March 1998) Vintage Books; (Vintage Departures) ISBN: 0375700765 Available from Amazon Books and others

"Hajime! With the crack of this whiplike word, enemies fall upon us. Implacably we begin."

--from Among Warriors

In 1991, Pamela Logan, a Shotokan Sandan who trained under Sensei Tsutomu Ohshima, undertook an extraordinary journey. At the age of 32, having finished work on a PhD in Aerospace Science, she decided to journey deep into Asia with the goal of locating the Khampa, the fierce nomad horsemen of Tibet, who had pursued guerilla warfare against the invading Chinese. To Ms Logan, they are some of the last true warriors in a world that has little interest in the old martial codes.

Page 5

KONDO NO SHOKAI / NOTES

Among Warriors

(Continued)

She compares them to "chivalrous knights of King Arthur's Round Table" or "disciplined and fearless samurai armies of Japanese shoguns...they flashed by me like purple lightning, but as they pass I caught a glimpse of glittering eyes Ė eyes charged with the intoxication of fully being."

Her journey has all the elements of a quest, for to attain her goal, Ms Logan must travel great distances either by hitchhiking or by bicycle, avoid the mercurial Chinese bureaucracy, and continually deal with misunderstandings arising from cultural differences. However, continually drawing on her experiences as a karateka, she perseveres -- and while she does not reach the other goals on her trip, Lhasa and Mustang -- she gains something more than she had hoped for.

She decorates her tale with numerous tales and reflections from her karate training. In particular, she tells of the special training sessions at her dojo, which are periods of intense group practice. These all-day and night sessions are designed to push the student to and beyond their physical and mental limits. She notes one of the sayings associated with these marathons, "ninety-nine miles of a hundred mile journey is just half way." Practicing numerous repetitions of basic techniques and fifty or more repetitions of a single kata on uneven ground in the cold night, she finds a hidden power to carry her on to the end. Later on, in Tibet she finds the strength within to get to her hundredth mile.

Editors Note- Ms Bates is currently at the University of Pittsburgh. She is with the Center for Emergency Medicine. Her URL is www. pitt.edu.rrbst 10.

________________________________________________________________________________

"To Deming we did go....Hi ho the merry oh...to Deming we did go"

Scott Wiseman

6th Dan,Shorei-Ryu Karate

Long Beach,California

CHAPTER ONE

Meet 4 travelers. On a Thursday morning at 3:00 a.m. PDT October 7, 1999. Headed down a highway filled with questions, filled with wonder, speculation and amazement. Not knowing what would await them in 15 hours at the end of their journey. 4 travelers. Sensei Charlie Tapia, Sensei Scott Wiseman and his two sons. In a little white van down freeway 91 to the 605 to the 10. Going east . East to a little town...a town in another state, another time, another place...DEMING!! Everything was going well. Sensei Wiseman was driving and Sensei Charlie was in the front passenger seat. Sensei Wisemans' sons were asleep in the back two seats of the van. We were about a whole 50 miles into our trip when the driver asked the passenger in the front seat a question and the passenger responded with the previous days lunch and dinner!!! You can imagine the surprise. We pulled over and allowed the other fellow traveler to "empty" his stomach.

We continued on our way after fellow traveler "who will remain nameless" just keep in mind that the sick one was not the driver, or his two sons!!

When the sun began to come up, we were three hours into our journey and the sick traveler had pulled over about three times. We stopped at the Morongo Indian Reservation by Palm Springs and bought some baking soda to delete any unnecessary odors and to soak up what deposits were in the front seat!!!

When we came to be about 150 miles from the border of Arizona, the sick one had to get rid of some more lunch so we pulled over in the desert and allowed sick one to relieve himself of more bacteria. As this was occuring, I looked into my rear view mirror and a CHiP (California Highway Patrol) officer had pulled up. He saw the sick one and asked if the van was o.k. The sick member of our group indicated that the van was fine...it was he that wasn't o.k. with this the sick one promptly demonstrated his new (and quickly learned) kata which we can name: lo-ose-yorlun-ch-ugh-chuck-sho!!The officer was so impressed he didn't even stick around to score the kata. I gave it a 10 for originality!!

 

 

Page 6

 

KONDO NO SHOKAI / NOTES

"To Deming we did go....Hi ho the merry oh...to Deming we did go"

(Continued)

We continued on our way and about 50 miles down the road, the sick traveler requested to practice his new found kata again. What do you think happened? Thatís right!! the SAME officer pulled up behind us again. I think he came back to score the kata but he didn't stick around..heck..he didn't even have the decency to get out of his car. With a strong tail wind behind him the officer disappeared in a cloud of dust and a hearty shake of his head. All that work that the sick traveler did learning the kata went the way of the wind in the desert.

As travel resumed, sick traveler consumed some baking soda remembering a simple remedy his mother taught him, (his mother is a Nurse). Then he slept for quite awhile and we didn't have to stop anymore for kata practice.

The wind was blowing at about 35 mph in the desert and blew all the way to the border town of Blythe. We gassed up (auto gas) and stopped to eat breakfast at the Local Health food joint called McDonalds. From here we changed drivers and headed into Arizona. As we proceeded into Arizona, Sensei Tapia proposed the question of seeing Shihan Contreras and Sensei Rodriguez-Contreras. As we were attempting to get to the night time work out in the Honbu on time, we decided to do this on the way back when we were not pressed so hard for time. From henceforth time seemed to stand still. Although we were getting closer, it seemed as though we were going slower.

Now you the reader may think that we were going to Deming to visit the Honbu, renew old friendships, pillow with kata and possibly "sword fight". Our actual intentions were to purchase mass quantities of fire works for the Millenium celebration and attend the NEW MEXICO STATE FAIRE. Not the little boxes like they sell in some cities of California but the REAL fireworks that fly in the air and give off the "rockets red glare!" We also wanted to have fun at the faire. My intention was to get some of Sensei Bacaís original salsa!! Note to reader: If you ever get to Deming you must bribe Sensei Baca to make her famous salsa that is her motherís recipe. It is the best I've ever tasted!!

Side NOTE to reader: If you go to Phoenix, you must convince Shihan Contreras to make his Posolle and Amolle (it is absolutely the best).

Isn't it great when a plan comes together? Some went to Deming to practice Karate. I went to get Fireworks, Salsa and enjoy the State Faire.

Back to our trip: We headed into Arizona and continued on through Phoenix, Tuscon and all points in between. We saw some amazing sights, Real Arizona Cattle, A famous Prison and the stadium that the Phoenix (setting) Suns play in (sorry Chris I'm a Laker Fan).

Around 5 P.M. Southwestern Time, we arrived into the State of New Mexico and realized that condition of Saddle sores and back pain had arrived. Sick traveller was done practicing his kata and all of us were numb at about this point. We could taste Deming. 7:15 p.m. Southwestern time we arrived into Deming and checked into the Motel. Left money for oldest to purchase well balanced meal of Dominoes Pizza. Sensei Charlie and myself threw on gi and drove to Honbu. Arrived at 7:30 just in time for class ending orei. What timing huh? Sensei Steve as gracious and pleasant a host as always was glad to see us. We were glad to see him too. Well we just began to warm up when we realized that our bodies would not comply with the orders of our minds. The "spirit is willing but the flesh is weak." Decided that overexerted bodies, not being stretched and fatigued were a formula for hamstring pulls and muscle spasms. A brief consensus concurred that the next morning would be a much better time to work out with less a chance for injury. Furthermore, we were just totally out of it and required a shower.

End Chapter 1: Next time our travelers talk about the motel, teddy bears, and Waylon Jennings, Jimi Hendrix Kata and Swords.

"What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us"- Anonymous

Page 7

KONDO NO SHOKAI / NOTES

O SENSEI

Chris Hoshiyama - 5th Dan Ė Renshi

Shorei-Ryu and Shuri-Ryu

Phoneix, Arizona

I would like to take a moment and introduce myself. My name is Chris Hoshiyama, a direct student of Trias Sensei from the old Phoenix Honbu Dojo.It has been 10 years this July since the passing of Grandmaster Robert A. Trias. Almost everyone knows about what Mr.Trias has done for karate, certainly each of you who are reading this now. I would like to talk about a side of the man that most do not know. He was not the type of man to ring his own bell or praise himself. He was quite humble and did not act like a man who gave guidance to so many. His kind heart was evident from his love of animals, and his tutoring of the young children at the dojo. Trias Sensei taught a regular Wednesday night yudansha class and always a Sunday morning class for the young students. On those Sunday mornings, he taught us kids techniques that most of the senior yudansha around the country didnít work. He loved all of his students regardless of race, creed or rank. He would make every effort to help his most dedicated students and push them to succeed. I do not have any doubt, that most of us would not be where we are today if not for O Sensei. I remember one day over a lunch of Mexican food, (his favorite) he told me something that has stuck in my mind. He said "Chris have no fear of what you do not achieve, fear only what you do not allow yourself to achieve." Which leads to one of his favorite sayings, "The path of the supreme way has no hindrance." Each of us has followed individual paths, but let's not forget who gave light to the entrance. O Sensei you are deeply missed.

Master Trias Memorial

In July 11th 1999, a memorial service was held to remember Robert A. Trias- Hanshi.

The day started with a reception to renew old friendships and to rejoice in the brotherhood of Karate-do.

Then a caravan went to the gravesite of O-Sensei, where his favorite songs were

remembered and prayers were given.

In his honor there was a small training session led by members of the Trias International Society. Robert Bowles- Hanshi, led the group through Sanchin kata, also the extension kata Sanmitsu and Sansei. Following was Pete Rabino- Kyoshi, who instructed kata Wansu with the use of the Chinese fan.This was taught to Shihan Rabino many years ago by Mr. Trias. Dale Benson- Kyoshi, gave a lesson on kumite and how to make the most of your techniques. Last was Johnny Linebarger- Shihan, who taught training drills to increase the speed and versatility in your technique. Also in attendance were John Pachivas-Hanshi, Jim Hawkes- Hanshi, Sandra Bowles-Shihan, Jack James, Mike Klier- Renshi and Gordon Garland. From the Trias Dojo, Tony Bisanz, Dan Besch, Larry Heimer, Maria Evans, Michelle Moses, Terry Soto-Benson and myself.

To end the ceremony each Karate-ka in attendance lit a candle in remembrance of

O-Sensei and closed with final words. We remembered a man who has given so much to all of us.

Chris Hoshiyama, Renshi

 

Page 8

KONDO NO SHOKAI / NOTES

SHOREI RYU KARATE IN BRAZIL

Carlos R. Silva

5th Dan Shorei-Ryu

Provo, Utah

The Style of Shorei ryu Karate in Brazil started with Grand Master MORITOSHI NAKAEMA, who is one of the oldest martial arts teachers in Brazil. Master MORITOSHI came from Okinawa and started to teach Karate in Brazil. He had the support of Grand Master RYUZO WATANABE, who is famous for the style of Goju- Ryu in Brazil. In the 1950ís Karate became a fad all over the country and everyone wanted to try out this new thing with all of itís strange exercises.

In Brazil Japanese SHOTOKAN was more popular than Goju Ryu and Shorei Ryu in the beginning, but by the late 50ís, early 60ís Goju Ryu became the prevalent style being practiced in the country.

The first Karate confederation formed in Brazil was CONFEDERACAO BRASILEIRA DE KARATE, CBK. This organization came from the CBP, CONFEDEFERACAO BRASILIEIRA DE PUGILISMO, and CBP, as do all confederations in Brazil. Judo was the first to form a confederation and then karate followed.

In the 1970ís for political reasons in that karate confederation there was a major controversy. Due to this differing within the CBK in the late 80ís, other confederations began to appear in Brazil. The first being POINT KARATE, I was the first Shorei-Ryu stylist to participate in that confederation, after which I also joined the INTERSTYLES KARATE Confederation.

Master MORITOSHI, became the head style of Shorei-Ryu Karate in Brazil and all from the style aligned themselves with him.

Mr. Pericles Damiski Veiga, Master Moritoshiís, favorite student, along with myself started to promote and to develop Shorei-Ryu Karate style in Brazil.

As taught by us in Brazil the system has 10 kyu ranks. The katas taught are as follows:

SAN CHIN, SANSEI, SAN MIZU, EMPI SHO, TSUE SHO, PASSAI DAI, GO PEI SHO, DAN PEI SHO, NAI HAN CHI SHO, NAI HAN CHI NI, NAI HAN CHI SAN, NAN DAN SHO, TE KATANA, TEN SHO, TEN DAI, KURURUNFA, SHUDOSOKAN KU SHO. Also taught are the Ippon Kumite Katas 1-13, the Taezu Naru Wazas and the Kihon Kumite Katas 1-30.

Our tournaments in Brazil are immense, they usually draw between 400 to 500 competitors. This coming November we will have the national Tournament in Sao Paulo City.

We now have our own organization in Brazil, FEDERACAO BRASILEIRA DE KARATE E KOBUDO, which MR. PERICLES DAMISKI VEIGA is President of. I myself am now in the USA, and have become a representative of some American martial arts organizations, and currently represent all Brazilian martial arts organizations in the United States. You can find our organization at this address: FEDERACAO BRASILEIRA DE KARATE E KOBUDO, av. nossa senhora do sabara, 2773, Vila arriete, sa paulo-SP, cep 04447-020, Brazil. I am the representative of this organization my address is CARLOS SILVA, 580N,100E., #3, Provo, UT, 84606-USA, Phone 801-343-2573.

Carlos

________________________________________________________________________________

Greetings !

David Richardson

5th Dan, Shuri-Ryu Goshin Jutsu Kempo

Silver Springs, New Mexico

Greetings Brothers and Sisters of the Kondo No Shokai. I trust you've all grown in knowledge, strength, and discipline since our last news letter. I'm sure we've all gotten rich beyond our wildest dreams andfulfilled our every desire. If only we could snap our fingers and make it all happen... What if we could make a difference, would we?

Page 9

KONDO NO SHOKAI / NOTES

Greetings !

(Continued)

I have been asking myself questions like this lately. My answers have been, yes I've grown in knowledge, no not in strength, no certainly not in discipline, and would I make changes if I could? YES! Now that I know what it is I want to change. It's going to be an up-hill battle all the way though.

I'm talking about politics in the sports our children are involved in. Baseball, football, basketball, track and I've even seen it in some martial art training halls. Why do we only have a few star players and a bunch of players sitting on the bench? Who is holding these children back from being developed as much as possible? Who determines a child's potential? What credentials do they have to make such an impact on a child's life. Are they educators? Should they be teaching sports? What are sports? Fun or play, a game. Where's the fun, who's game is it?

I would like us all to ask ourselves these questions and whether we can change things. It must be otherwise in our training halls. We have to be aware of what we say and how we say it when we teach. What effect will we have on these children now and in the future? What values are we cultivating in these students? Do we teach each individual on their level of comprehension and physical state or do we adapt the student to the art instead of the art to the student?

Well, enough food for thought for now. I welcome all comments!

You all keep kickin' and punchin' and don't forget to shift your hips for power!

Shihan Dave Richardson

________________________________________________________________________________

Naihanchi 1,2,3

C. Michial Jones

4th Dan,Shorei-Ryu,Shuri-ryu,Goju-Ryu,Shito-Ryu

Kobudo- Shihan Menkyo

Westfield,Indiana

(Also known as Daipochin, Naifunchin, Naifunchi, Nihanshi, and Tekki and translated as "Iron Horse," "Missing Enemy," "Sideways Fighting," "Inside Fighting,""Fighting Holding Your Ground," and "Surreptitious Steps.")

These three short kata were the first to be taught in Shuri-te. They have been practiced in Okinawa for hundreds of years and were practiced by Shuri, Naha, and Tomari-te. Most traditions say that Bushi Matsumura created the Naihanchi Kata, Sho and Ni, in order to develop fighting with your back against a wall or on a narrow rice-paddy dike. Itosu is said to have modified Sho and Ni and developed Naihanchi San. This was confirmed in the writings of Mabuni and Funakoshi.

Kenwa Mabuni, the founder of Shito-Ryu, learned all three from Ankoh Itosu.However,first, while traveling and studying, Mabuni learned a form of Naihanchi from a student of Matsumuraís named Matayoshi. When Mabuni returned and showed the kata to Itosu, his teacher remarked that it was similar to the kata Matsumura had devised after training with a Chinese attache named Channan. It was at this time that Itosu confirmed that he (Itosu) had modified them as well.

Gichin Funakoshi stated in his 1922 book that the first two Naihanchi were originally practiced in a pigeon-toed stance, while the third was performed in a horse stance. Funakoshi later revised all three Naihanchi (by changing them all to horse stance and other modifications) and called them Tekki. Therefore these modified kata are not actually Shorei-Ryu or Zhoalin Liu as Funikoshi stated in his Karate-do Kyohan.

Naihanchi is remembered as the favorite of Itosu, who was nicknamed "Iron Horse" because of his performance of this kata. Choki Motobu also preferred the Naihanchi kata and is credited with combining the three into one; known as "O Naihanchi." Although these kata are relatively simple-looking forms, they have elaborate and deadly bunkai incorporated into them such as sweeps, joint-locks, throws, and grappling techniques that are not readily apparent in the surface execution. It is obvious that kakushite ( hidden hand weapons) permeates these kata in the form of many tuite techniques and this may

explain why some form of Naihanchi is practiced in virtually all styles, whether Okinawan, Korean, or Japanese.

Page 10

KONDO NO SHOKAI / NOTES

TRAINING IN SOLITUDE

Terrance J. Dunn

4TH Dan, Trias-Kan (Shorei)

Phoenix, Arizona

In and around 1984 I left the Trias Dojo to train with Mr. Koyama of the Arizona Karate Association. My motivation was not out of any spite for Sensei Trias or any of the members, but rather the direction the dojo had been going for the last several years - away from the fundamentals. It became a situation in which students could have "knowledge" of several advanced kata and weapons but could not do a proper punch.

For six months I wore a white belt and trained in nothing but the basics at Mr.Koyama's dojo. I did nothing but the Heian (Pinan) kata. I returned to the Trias Dojo and until the time of his death in 1989 I continued to train on nothing but the fundamentals and in solitude. Three nights a week in the side dojo my 90 minute workouts consisted of: 10 minutes stretching, 10 minutes basic punching, walking, and kicking, 30 minutes practicing a basic kata (mostly the Pinan series) 10 Ė15 times ONLY ONE KATA PER NIGHT, 30 minutes practicing no more than 5 waza (taken from the ippon, kihon, or five movements from one of the kata to make up a waza) 15 times on each side of my body, and lastly, 10 minutes striking the makiwari. On occasion I would replace the basic kata with a more advanced Shorei kata. It is amazing how easy the advanced kata are performed when the basics are practiced intensively.

Since Sensei's death I have followed essentially the same training regimen. Other teachers in town who broke away from the USKA had no use for me and quite frankly I had no use for their training methods either. Besides I had been training in the art for at least 10 years longer than they had. The major addition has been incorporating weight training in my routine. This is done three times a week for no more than 30 minutes.

The goal of weight training in karate is to build strength while maintaining speed endurance, and balance. Compound speed movements are the best. These include Power Cleans, Dead Lifts, and Farmer Walks (This is picking up a 50, 75, or 100 pound plate and briskly walking with it for 10 sets of 50 feet. This can also be done with dumbbells), rapid military presses, and what I call "Motobu throws" - picking up a 50 -100 pound plate, holding it next to my chest, and throwing it as far as I can ending

with both of my fists extended making vertical fists. On occasion I do dumbbell punches in sets of 100 on each arm. I begin with 25 pounds, punch (with form) as long as I can until my arms can no longer hold them, drop them pick up 15 pound dumb bells and continue. Lastly, I do squats on a Smith Machine and on the way up or down I do a basic front snap kick.

I have about 2,000 pounds in free weights in my home dojo, but on occasion I go to a commercial gym to train. Mr. Bernstein of the Phoenix House Of Karate has been kind enough to let me train at his dojo. I go to the commercial gym not to "chat," etc., but rather to train my concentration. The ability to totally focus on weight training with all the pretty ladies walking around in gym clothes is a challenge!!!!

The only down side to training by one's self is the lack of a sparing partner for waza training. The older I get the more I am convinced that fee style (kumite) is counter-productive if it takes more than 15 percent of one's training time. However, the use of a bag in place of a partner does help.

In the Yellow Pages many karate schools advertise "Non Dungeon" Type of " Training." In fact, many are presented as social clubs more so than the type of environment many of us experienced in the 60s at the Trias Dojo.

Training in solitude is quite similar to dungeon training, as there is no talking, socializing, etc. The goal is total concentration. Indeed, except at the commercial gym, I do not tolerate anyone talking to me during workouts. I become very angry if anyone interrupts me in the middle of a kata or in the middle of my power cleans. This is similar in scope and focus to when I was a white belt. Sensei Trias would not allow any talking in his class nor would he even answer the telephone. Training in solitude is much like being in one of his basic classes.

To all Shorei Members: Have a great year 2,000!

Page 11

KONDO NO SHOKAI / NOTES

LIVING WITH TRAUMA

Steve Salaiz November 19,1999

3nd Dan Shorei-Ryu Karate

Deming, New Mexico

Do you ever take what you're learning and teaching others for granted?  Take the time to think about this question.  On November 19, 1999 I was in a situation that very few people would/will experience.  I work at Deming Middle School, and on this day our school experienced a tragedy.  A student shot and killed another student.  I was in the teachers' lounge when all of this happened.  This is where we (other teachers, some students and myself) took shelter until the police took control of the situation.

I know that I was able to function during this time because of my martial arts training.  My training took over, and even though I was scared, I didn't panic.  My one single thought during this time was to keep people who were in the lounge safe.  Some details of things that I saw and experienced will not be written in this article.

PRESENT TIME :

May priorities are different now.  I am not the same person that I was before that Friday afternoon.  I now experience symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.  But, I consider myself lucky.  I am alive.  The dojo has always been a special place for me, now it (dojo) is helping me get well.  Sensei (Terry Sanders) is a counselor for the school district where I work.  He has helped me learn to live/cope with this experience.  Arigato Sensei.

The everyday things are no longer routine.  Certain stimuli trigger emotional and physical responses.  Some days are better than others.  I am able to cope with things if I am able to get in a good heavy bag workout at least twice a week.  This combined with kata and teaching karate classes twice a week is good therapy.  Obviously, this type of therapy is not for everyone, but it works for me and that is what matters.

People have told me that the situation could have been worse, but that somebody was watching over us.  To say it was chance, fate, destiny or karma doesn't help in finding answers. Recovery from this type of trauma is a long process, but I know I will survive.

  Respectfully submitted, Steve Salaiz

Sandan Shorei-ryu Karate

________________________________________________________________________________

PROMOTIONS IN THE DOJO

Tina Lawhorn

2nd Dan Ė Shorei-Ryu

Deming, New Mexico

I have been in karate for six years, in April. I recently received my ni dan. We have had many promotions, of course, but I can remember only three promotions to black belt, besides my own. All of them were very emotional occasions. The first that I remember was of the first woman to receive her black belt in our dojo. She made a speech that had almost everyone in tears. The most recent promotion went to my best friend and my very good friend. All of the "old" black belt holders, including myself, had to say something encouraging to the "new" dan holders or something about them. I was the

third out of four to speak. When it was my turn to speak, my best friend and I were already in tears, but I managed to get through my speech. Then it was the "new" black belt holders' turn to make their speeches. My good friend had no trouble, my best friend had a little trouble getting hers out, because she was crying, along with everyone else. Then there was my promotion to black belt. I'd have to say it was my worst experience. I didn't get three words out before I was crying so hard I couldn't speak. My sensei said, the least I could say was thanks to my mom for making me go and I did manage to get that out. They will probably never let me live that down. I believe that receiving your first black belt is one of the greatest honors in your life. In closing, I'd like to say, set your goals and go for them, NEVER give up, because in the end, it's worth it.

Tina Lawhorn- Ni dan

Page 12

 

KONDO NO SHOKAI / NOTES

SHOREI-RYU KARATE CAMP

JUAN CARLOS TAPIA

2ND Dan- SHOREI-RYU

KOBUDO- SENSEI OYAKAWA

SO.GATE, CALIF.

The ANNUAL KARATE CAMP IS HELD IN RIVERSIDE, CALIF. WHERE IT HAS TAKING PLACE FOR THE PAST 18 YEARS. THE CAMP WAS STARTED IN 1980 BY JOHN SOLTIS, RENSHI WITH THE GUARDANCE OF HIS SENSEI PHILIP PERALES, HANSHI. THIS EXERCISE IS HELD EACH YEAR AS ONE OF THE CALIFORNIA FEDERATION OF BLACK BELTS MAIN ACTIVITIES. STILL UNDER THE GUARDANCE OF MASTER PERALES THE CAMP IS ATTENDED BY THOSE STUDENTS WHO MAINTAIN AT LEAST A "C" AVERAGE IN SCHOOL, HAVE REGULAR CLASS ATTENDANCE (KARATE CLASSES) AND ARE DISCIPLINED IN THE WAY OF THE MARTIAL ARTS. I HAVE BEEN PRESENT AT THIS CAMP FOR THE PAST 12 YEARS FIRST AS A STUDENT AND FOR THE PAST 5 YEARS AS AN INSTRUCTOR.

BETWEEN 25 TO 35 STUDENTS FROM THE DIFFERENT SHOREI-RYU DOJOS, WHICH ARE RAN BY THE DIFFERENT MEMBERS OF THE CFBB HERE IN CALIFORNIA, ARE TAKEN TO CAMP EACH YEAR.

THE CAMP FACILITIES ARE PART OF THE DIVINE WORD SEMINARY (NOW USED FOR MEETINGS, RETREATS, AND AS STOP OVER FOR CLERGY AND RETIREMENT FOR OLDER PRIESTS). THE CAMP IS HELD FOR FIVE DAYS, STARTING ON A WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON AND FINISHING SUNDAY MORNING. AT THE CAMP THERE ARE SPACIOUS DORMITORIES, WORKOUT ROOMS, A TV VIEWING ROOM, SHOWERS, KITCHEN, AND A LARGE DINNING AREA. A DAYS ROUTINE FOLLOWS;

4:30 AM ĖWAKEUP TIME (BUGLE CALL!!)

5:00 AM Ė ASSEMBLY IN THE MAIN DOJO FOR YOGA WORKOUT WITH PERALES HANSHI

6:00 AM Ė MORNING HIKE FOR A HALF HOUR

6:30 AM- CLEAN DORMS, BED INSPECTION

7:00 AM Ė BREAKFAST, AFTER THE MEAL CLEANUP TIME, ALL KYU RANKS HAVE A JOB ASSIGNMENT, EITHER WASHING DISHES, CLEANING TABLES, OR SWEEPING AND MOPPING.

THE STUDENTS ARE DIVIDED INTO 3 AGE GROUPS, GROUP (A) AGES 8-10, GROUP (B) AGES 11-14 AND GROUP (C) AGES 15 AND UP. EACH YUDANSHA IS ASSIGNED A CLASS ROOM AND THE SUBJECT THEY ARE TO TEACH.THEY ARE USUALLY ASSISTED BY A BROWN BELT.

THE ACTIVITIES FOR THE DAY ARE BROKEN UP INTO CLASS PERIODS THAT CONSIST OF KATA, KUMITE, KOBUDO, BREAKING, AND ARTS AND CRAFTS WHICH ARE CONDUCTED BY MRS.PERALES WITH AID FROM THE YUDANSHA. THERE ARE FIVE TO TEN MINUTE BREAKS BETWEEN EACH PERIOD.

LUNCH IS SERVED A 12:00 PM, AFTER WHICH CLEANUP CHORES ARE PERFORMED AND THEN THE AFTERNOON SESSION OF CLASSES START. THESE CLASSES RUN UNTIL 5:00PM, STUDENTS ARE THEN REQUIRED TO WASH UP AND TO GET READY FOR DINNER WHICH IS SERVED AT ABOUT 5:30 PM. AFTER DINNER KITCHEN DUTIES ARE PERFORMED. STUDENTS SHOWER AND GET READY FOR THE MOVIE SHOWN IN THE TV ROOM STARTING AT 7:00PM, LIGHTS ARE OUT AT 10:00PM.

FRIDAY A TALENT SHOW IS CONDUCTED. THE ANNUAL BREAKING OF THE PINATA TO CELEBRATE OUR UNITY AND AS PART OF THE CAMPS MANY TRADITIONS IS ALSO DONE. AWARDS ARE PRESENTED AND CAKE AND ICE CREAM IS SERVED.

ON SUNDAY MORNING THE LAST DAY OF CAMP WE END WITH A SMALL SHIAI, THE STUDENTS GET TO SHOW THEIR PARENTS SOME OF THE THINGS THEY HAVE LEARNED OVER THE PAST FOUR DAYS.

SOME OF THE PAST GUESTS AT CAMP HAVE BEEN TERRY SANDERS (HANSHI), CHARLIE CONTRERAS(SHIHAN), CATHY CONTRERAS (SENSEI), STEVE SALIZ (SENSEI), GARY ARGO(SENSEI), PLUS NUMEROUS OTHER BLACK BELTS REALLY TO MANY TO NAME HERE. THEY COME AS GUESTS BUT ALSO HAVE A HAND IN TEACHING AND GIVING TO THE STUDENTS AT THIS CAMP.

I AM A BIG SUPPORTER OF THIS CAMP AND I INVITE ALL KONDO NO SHOKAI MEMBERS TO PAY A VISIT TO THIS CAMP. FOR MORE DETAILS ABOUT THE CAMP PLEASE WRITE ME CHARLIE TAPIA , ADDRESS 3359 SEQUIA DR. SOUTH GATE, CALIF. 90280 OR CALL 1 323-569-2392 AND I WILL BE HAPPY TO SUPPLY YOU WITH THIS INFORMATION. ARRIGATO!!

CHARLIE TAPIA SENSEI

Page 13

KONDO NO SHOKAI / NOTES

Subject: Honbu Visit

 

Travis Bailey

1st Dan Ė Shorei-Ryu

Allen,Texas

This Christmas break from college was both a relaxing and educational experience. The drive of 600 miles, one way, from Dallas, TX to Deming, NM took about 13 hours with few stops. I might definitely consider the Super Saver Fares from websites such as AA.com and Southwest.com in the

future. The purpose of my trip to Kondo No Shokai was four days of extensive training, renewal and counseling with our Style Head, Terry Sanders. I have been a very bad shodan and am changing my slothful ways. For four days Mr. Sanders and myself reviewed kata], then he taught me Shirotaro No Kon and Suparinpe.

To those other uncommitted slothful black belts, a revelation came to me that if I taught what I know, I wouldnít forget it anymore. What an idea! If we teach it we remember it. Do you remember all the self-esteem and value that martial arts have added to your character? Well, someone else out there needs you to teach karate to them.

Please keep me in your thoughts and prayers as I begin teaching for my first time with my own school.

Travis Bailey

________________________________________________________________________________

MY TWO CENTS

 

RASHEEDAH POLK

1ST Dan, Shorei-Ryu

Lynwood, California

Cornell University, New York

Hello All!

I know you guys don't hear from me that much, but I just thought I would put my two cents in this time.

Let me just say, that I am a student of Karate, and I hope to always be a disciple of karate. I am constantly learning and becoming more aware of things, which concern my art and system. Things which have been taught to me by my Senseis over the years. I know that my Senseis' who have been in karate for 30+ years still think of themselves as students, still reading and reseaching things such as our katas for their origin, interpretation and the likes. They, students of their art are still willing to learn new things all the time. So, when considering letting others into the Kondo No Shokai, I think they should be open for learning and with the attitude and the desire to learn and to help to strengthen their style and our Association. They should not come in for selfish matters such as seeking rank, or trying to dictate and to judge all the time.

To me the quality of karate is in the performance of we students of our karate, from hachi kyu to the Yudansha ranks. By the amount of practice and dedication one puts INTO their kata, wazas, and all things which are essential in maintaining a strong discipline. The way we handle our knowledge of karate by constantly striving to perfect and LEARN from it. I trust that all of you have seen people who have been both exceptional and disappointing in these areas. Someone who is willing to give of himself or herself freely in order to promote their art is someone I think has QUALITY in their karate.

Well looks like my two cents grew to be a whole dime.


Take Care, Rasheedah

Page 14

 

 

KONDO NO SHOKAI / NOTES

KYUíS KORNER-

The Benefits of Karate

David Lewis

Ni-Kyu, Shorei-Ryu

Lynwood, California

My name is David Lewis. I have been a student of Shorei - Ryu karate for almost six years. In those six years I have learned that karate can be very challenging, and also a very beneficial martial art. When I first started in the marital arts I had a very bad attitude. No one could tell me anything, I knew it all and would argue the point. I was shown that this was going to have to change.

My Black Belt instructors didnít care if you cried, grumbled or whatever, there was only one way things were to be done and that was their way. You could stay, but your attitude would have to leave. These men were here to help you to learn discipline and to show you things that could possibly keep you from getting killed by some crazy person out there in the street.

Well over the years there have been some ups and downs, problems that thanks to my karate, I didnít let get to me. There have been times when people have tried to intimidate me, to see if they could rattle me and get me to fight them. When these situations occur I usually assume a musubi dachi and focus my attention straight ahead. This seems to bother most bullies to the point where they leave me alone.

I know longer argue, and I donít let the things they say get to me anymore.

In conclusion I would have to say Karate is not something I do, Karate is something I love! I longer have to walk with my head down; it has given me the confidence I never had before. I am proud of who I am, what I have achieved, and what I still hope to accomplished in Karate.

________________________________________________________________________________

VIVA KARATE, VIVAR

Samuel Vivar

San-kyu, Shorei-Ryu

Lynwood, Calif.

I was 9 years old when I started in Karate. I had tried several other sports, like soccer and baseball but I didnít like them at all. My father asked me if I would like to try doing Karate, so I said yes. Shortly after we started looking around and visited various dojos and looked at the different styles that they offered. I found it very interesting watching the training, which went on inside the dojos. We finally found a style I thought I would like it was called Shorei-Ryu. It looked like Karate would be fairly easy, but I found out it wasnít going to be so. Now even after almost 5 years of training in Karate, and a brown belt it is still a challenge to me both physically as well as mentally.

On July 17, 1999 I was awarded my brown belt, this was one of the best things I have done so far in my life. Over the years I have gained a lots of confidence, thanks to Karate. Iím always being told by people that I can do anything I want to. I get asked what do I want to be when I grow up, and I always answer a Black Belt to go along with whatever else I might become. I hope always to continue working out as a Karate-ka.

My parents also encourage me with my Karate studies, telling me to work hard and to stay in Karate.

People sometimes tease me for being in Karate. These people think Karate is just kicks and punches but it isnít itís about controlling oneís mind and body. If they only knew what they were missing Iím sure some of them would really enjoy it themselves, and would really befit from the workouts.

My Sensei always tells me to work hard and to practice, those two things are most important if you are to succeed in Karate and in life. If I donít practice and work hard I will get sloppy and weak in my techniques. You also start to forget things if you donít practice. I hope to always stay in Karate and to learn many new things in the martial arts.

Page 15

KONDO NO SHOKAI / NOTES

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING TO DO

Beverly Guzman

Go-Kyu, Shorei-Ryu

Lynwood, CA

 

I started Shorei Ryu karate when I was 10 years old. The reason I started in Karate was because my parents wanted me to try different things until I found something I enjoyed.

When I was growing up all of my relatives moved very far away, so my family and I bought a new home in Lynwood, California. I had to go to a new school and make new friends. A couple weeks later my parents enrolled me in karate. I thought I was going to drop out of it soon, but a few weeks into the program I realized that I liked karate, so I stayed with it.

Now Iím in 7th grade, and Iíve very lucky to have had the opportunity to be in karate. I met new people and made lots of new friends. Now I donít think of karate as an obligation, but as something I enjoy doing.

When I see other girls in my class unhappy with karate, I feel that they should try it for a while. I use to think my parents did not love me because they would make me do things I didnít like. (Like summer school) Now I know that they did and do love me, all they wanted for me is to gain confidence and self-esteem.

Karate not only has shown me how to defend myself, but has also helped me to open my eyes to the world and see that there are not only good things in the world, but bad things too. Plus I have so much fun going to tournaments and competing with other students. When I go to a tournament, I feel proud to show off what Iíve learned in my class. Tournaments are a great deal of fun, even though there are many children there, and I may not get a chance to participate as much as I want. Itís nice to see what other children are doing/learning too.

As your rank goes higher, your work gets harder. Now, as a green belt, I have much more responsibility, but itís a lot more fun. My goal is to get my Black Belt and become a Sensei to pass on our style of Karate; which my Senseis have taught me.

I am happy to have had great teachers in my past, and my great teacher now: who give their best so I

can be the best!

________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

 

Character, like tea, reveals its strength in hot water

Anonymous

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Page 16